Sardinia attractions

Sardinia … an incredible place to see. You may wonder if you need to stop at every nuraghe, and if you haven’t become fascinated with these mysterious towers by now, perhaps you shouldn’t. But most tourists quickly fall under the spell of these towers of which so much remains unknown, and soon discover that each one is quite different. Considered one of the three best, Losa has several distinctions. It is lighted inside by recessed lamps, so if you don’t carry a flashlight, this is your chance to see the interior details of its stacked stone thalos domes. It is one of the most complex, a large tower with three outer towers forming a triangular bastion, which you can explore through a maze of stone passageways that spiral up inside its massive walls. The second floor is still intact and the roof complete. Although dating from about the 12th to 14th centuries BC (the Bronze Age), the large central room of the main tower is in excellent condition and more refined in its construction than most others. A tiny museum contains bronze bracelets and other artifacts found here.

Situated on the north west coast, Alghero still shows traces of its Catalan past, whose use has been preserved in the variant of the “algherese”, and spoken nowadays in a small percentage. The town boasts a striking Gothic-style historic center with the Cathedral of Santa Maria, the Guillot Palace and the 14th-century Church of San Francesco, the Coral Museum and a long natural bay overlooking the emerald sea. Situated on the north west coast, it has the romantic charm of the river cities and a lot of traditions still alive. The historic district of the city worthwhile to visit, made by colorful houses that climb the hill on the side. The top of the hill is dominated by the Malaspina Castle, so called by the Tuscan family who built it up in the XII century. The Castle can be seen from the historic Ponte Vecchio of Bosa, considered one of the 30 most beautiful bridges in Italy. More details about Luxury Travel in Italy

Grotto di Ispinigoli, The are sparkly geological wonders to be found here, deep inside the island’s largest cave. This is also the site of the one of the most important archaeological discoveries of Nuragic and Phoenician artifacts. You can peer into the Abbisso delle Vergini (Abyss of the Virgins) or explore the eight kilometers worth of deep caves with a guide. The Mamoiada Masks Museum, The small town of Mamoiada is best known for its traditional masks, known as the ‘Mamuthones’ and the ‘Issohadores’. A visit to the Mamoida Masks Museum is the best way to learn about this fascinating aspect of Sardinian culture. If you can not be here for Carnival, celebrated from January 17 through to Mardi Gras every year, the museum is the next best thing.

Just like many other islands, Sardinia has a very rich and unique wildlife. The isolation has pretty much given it the gift of diversity. None of the animals that live on or near Sardinia are poisonous or very dangerous, so you can explore the island without fear. Unique species of deer and foxes live in the woods and mountains, while many different types of birds, including the Chaffinch and Flamingo, visit the island every year in great numbers. Monk seals and turtles live in the Sardinian waters, and the Balaenoptera Physalus (or fin whale) can be spotted near the shores quite regularly.